Late Flowering Fruit Trees to Avoid Frost Damage

Hello Fruit Tree Enthusiasts…

Why late flowering fruit tree cultivars?
We have a couple of clients with South facing slopes in Missouri. These slopes warm up much faster than North facing slopes and as such will tend to flower before the last frost thus killing the pollinated blossoms and eliminating the crop. So I emailed our Plant Guy, Bryce Ruddock, to make some recommendations.

Late blooming fruit tree cultivars can greatly minimize frost damage.

His response was so helpful we thought many of you might appreciate what he shared with us as well.  Here is the email from Bryce. Enjoy. Continue reading “Late Flowering Fruit Trees to Avoid Frost Damage”

Plant Guild Workshop

A Full Day with Bryce Ruddock
Author of the Plant Guilds e-Booklet

Next Scheduled Workshop   —  Spring 2016 —  Check back for date
Price:  $95.00  Includes Lunch and printed copy of the Plant Guilds eBooklet  ($20 value)
At Midwest Permaculture in Stelle, IL  (Limit 24 Students)

Bryce will Cover the Essentials:

  1. What is a Plant Guild
  2. What are the Key Elements
  3. What are the Functions we are Designing For
  4. What, Where & When Should we Plant
  5. How Plant Guilds make up a Food Forest
  6. Locating Key Plant Databases and How to Access Them online
  7. Sources for Good Plant Stock

Students Will Also:

  1. On Walk — Identity Naturally Formed Plant Guilds
  2. See Plant Guilds Created by Midwest Permaculture
  3. Help Design and Actually Plant a Guild with Bryce
                            Bring Your Gloves…!!!  

Private Consultations with Bryce… If you have a specific project and would like Bryce’s undivided attention and recommendations, we will set a few private, 1-hour appointments on Saturday evening and Sunday Morning.  Call ahead to reserve… or… seek out Bryce following the workshop should you feel you still need additional assistance. Price: $95.00/hr.

Bryce Ruddock - Plant Guilds eBooklet

Continue reading “Plant Guild Workshop”

Plant ID Walk: Table Rock (mesa)

My husband and I took a walk one day in early summer up to the top of a mesa on his parents’ land near Colorado Springs, Colorado called Table Rock.  The environment on top of the mesa is very dry, very rocky, and very windy, and as a result much of the flora hugs the ground closely.  It is the first place on the ~80-acre parcel of land to dry out in the summer.  There are small caves and splits in the rock at the top that create wildlife habitat and microclimates.  A lot of wildlife calls Table Rock home, including mountain lions, bats, deer, foxes, raccoons, hawks, and falcons.  In a permaculture design, the marginal land on top of Table Rock and its steep sides would be best left to nature as Zone 5.

Here is a sampling of some of the plants found on Table Rock:

Stonecrop (Sedum stenopetalum):

Stonecrop (Sedum stenopetalum)

Continue reading “Plant ID Walk: Table Rock (mesa)”

Plant ID Walk: Around the Pasture

My husband’s parents raise Scottish Highland cattle on the high plains of Colorado.  Besides the grasses that the cattle eat, there are many interesting “weeds” and other plants growing in the pastures.  In this hot and dry year, as spring officially became summer in June, the pasture grasses had already gotten too sparse for the Highlands to be able to feed themselves, they are now being fed with hay and off the pasture so that it can recover.  Meanwhile, most of the native (and non-native) “weeds” in the pasture, more drought-tolerant than the grasses, are still thriving.

Here is a sampling of some of the plants found in an example pastureland on the high plains of Colorado:

Miner’s candle (Cryptantha virgata):

Miner's candle (Cryptantha virgata)

Continue reading “Plant ID Walk: Around the Pasture”

Internet Resources for Identifying Plants

This post is made by one of our students as part of her PDC Home Correspondence Course.

Here is a list of Internet databases and other resources that I’ve found helpful in identifying plants and their potential uses in permaculture designs.

General

North American native plants

Continue reading “Internet Resources for Identifying Plants”